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Ask a grammar snob: using to and too

I admit it. I’m a grammar snob. I scoff when I hear people misuse who and whom. I snicker when I see a misplaced their (when instead it should be there). And, I am saddened by the gratuitous use of apostrophes. But what good is laughing behind someone’s back if I can’t turn back around and help that person get it right? Call it altruistic grammar snobbery.to-bad

Even outside of the editorial microcosm, good grammar is the mark of education, intelligence, and attention to detail. Having a firm grasp of grammar doesn’t necessarily mean you went to an Ivy League school; however, I’ve seen plenty of highly intelligent, well-educated people completely butcher the English language and offend my grammatical sensibilities.

To do my part to make the world a better place — and, selfishly, so I don’t have to see any more grammar mistakes — I present you with the first installation of Ask a Grammar Snob.

Dear Grammar Snob,

I often see the words to and too, but don’t know the right times to use them?

Signed,
To confused

Dear To,

Even your signature is a grammatical error. For shame! Don’t worry, I’ll show you the proper usage of the words to and too so you won’t embarrass yourself in the future.

Use “to” as a preposition or as part of an infinitive.

  • I went to the store to buy some eggs.
  • I want to see a movie.
  • When you send a letter to your mom, make sure to use a stamp.
  • Where to, Romeo?

Incorrect:
I want some, to.
You to can be like me.

Use “too” as you would use the words also or very.

  • I want some eggs and soyrizo, too.*
  • You are too cute.
  • I, too, think bacon is nasty.

And, finally, some required reading. No editor’s desk drawer is without a copy of Strunk and White’s Elements of Style.

Signed,
The Grammar Snob

* Notice the comma prior to the word “too.” We’re not going to get into comma usage, but know that you should always use a comma before too when it’s at the end of a sentence.
photo credit: ifindkarma


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